When it comes to choosing which is better between the hard disk drive and the solid state drive, the answer mainly depends on every user’s storage needs, preferences, budget, and other factors.

Although the solid state drive is considered faster than the hard disk drive, it’s not automatically perceived better overall.

Here, we’ll give you a brief background about the two types of storage devices. We’ll likewise discuss some of their common differences so you’ll better understand which is best suited to your needs.

 

Brief Background

hard-drive-1348507_640Introduced to the world by IBM in 1956, the hard disk drive is a non-volatile memory or storage device that utilizes magnetism to hold up data on a rotating disk platter.

Just above its spinning disk platter, a read/write head floats to read and write pieces of information.

Most hard disk drives today can spin at either 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute) or 7,200RPM. Some server-based disk platters can even spin at up to 15,000RPM.

The faster the disk platter rotates, the faster a hard disk drive can read or write data.

Meanwhile, the solid state drive can be roughly thought of as an oversized and more complex version of the USB flash drive.

Similar to a flash drive, the solid state drive does not contain moving parts. Instead, it makes use of the non-volatile, (negative-AND) NAND-based flash memory.

Unlike a hard disk drive, the solid state drive also utilizes an embedded processor called the controller. The controller is a determining factor in terms of speed as it performs a bunch of operations such as reading/writing, caching, cleaning up data, and more.

 

In order to better explain some of the differences between the hard disk drive and the solid state drive, we’ve created for you a chart below:

 

Attributes

 

 

Hard Disk Drive

 

 

Solid State Drive

 

     
Capacity

 

For notebook-sized drives, it can usually hold around 500GB to 2TB. Desktops can typically hold up to 10TB.

 

For notebook-sized drives, it’s typically not bigger than 1TB. For desktops, it can usually carry up to 4TB.

 

Read/Write Speed

 

Speed can be from 50 MB/s to 120 MB/s

 

Speed can be from 200 MB/s to 550 MB/s

 

Encryption

 

Some models support Full Disk Encryption

 

Some models support Full Disk Encryption

 

Operating System Boot Time

 

May take an average of 30-40 seconds

 

May take an average of 10-13 seconds

 

Power Draw

 

Draws more power with an average of 6-7 watts. Therefore, it utilizes more battery.

 

Draws less power with an average of 2-3 watts only.

 

File Opening Speed

 

Much slower than the solid state drive

 

Way faster than the hard disk drive by up to 30%

 

Vibration

 

Spinning motion of the disk platters may result in vibration

 

It has no moving parts, thus it DOESN’T make any vibration

 

Noise

 

Spinning motion of the disk platters may result to some audible clicks

 

It has no moving parts, thus it DOESN’T make any sound.

 

Heat Produced

 

Higher power draw and moving parts may cause some measurable amount of heat

 

Very little heat produced due to lower amount of power drawn

 

Failure Rate

 

1.5 million hours mean time between failure rate

 

2.0 million hours mean time between failure rate

 

Magnetism Affected?

 

Data saved may be erased by magnets.

 

Safe from the effects of magnetism
October 8, 2016
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Hard Disk Drive vs. Solid State Drive

When it comes to choosing which is better between the hard disk drive and the solid state drive, the answer mainly depends on every user’s storage […]